A comparison between the ancient egyptian sculptures of khafre and the seated scribe

Edit Generally speaking, when it comes to Old Kingdom art there are basic patterns typically followed.

A comparison between the ancient egyptian sculptures of khafre and the seated scribe

Although the images are ordered primarily by chronology, they can be used to address a variety of themes throughout the lecture to guide discussions and related assignments.

Egyptian Sculpture: History, Characteristics

Conventions in Ancient Egyptian art: This theme focuses on how certain conventions persisted over thousands of years. Consider why certain conventions were used for such long periods of time, also discussing why certain conventions changed over time.

If you have already covered the art of the Ancient Near East, comparisons can be made between the conventions of Ancient Egypt and those of the Ancient Near East. Perhaps stemming from a consideration of hieroglyphs, students can see how visual images are often abstracted and standardized to emphasize certain symbolic meanings, in contrast to showing objects and people as they would appear in real life.

How does idealization relate to social and political structures? Ask students to compare with our own standards of depicting leaders in the media.

Why was art in Ancient Egypt created, and for whom was it made? The art of Ancient Egypt was largely created for elites, with visual conventions expressing consistent ideals. A persistent concern with death, burial, and the afterlife were also driving forces of Egyptian visual culture.

You might start discussion around the first object by asking your students how we prepare for major life events, posing the following questions to them: Chances are, many of your students will be able to relate to this. How many of you have made plans for when you die, your funeral, and your trip into the afterlife having a tomb or coffin built, deciding what to have buried with you, figuring out what the afterlife might look like?

It is less probable—although not completely unlikely!

Egypt and Mesopotamia – ART FX: World History of Art I

Ancient Egyptian culture was predicated in large part on a very close relationship to death, and to understand much of the material culture in this lesson, students need to understand from the beginning that Ancient Egyptians thought about death and what happened after death in a radically different way than we do today.

Death was always immanent for the peoples of the Ancient Near East, as there was so much civil unrest. It was quite the opposite in Ancient Egypt, where the ruling dynasties of kings and pharaohs created a stable atmosphere where people could plan for the end of their lives and their afterlife, much the same way some people have Ks and retirement plans today.

The Palette of Narmer provides an excellent starting point to discuss how art in Ancient Egypt was created by and for elites. Often, as it is in this case, a pharaoh commissioned artworks in order to proclaim his divine power and absolute authority through set visual conventions.

The unnatural and stylized human figures in the Palette of Narmer introduce many of the standard ways of portraying the human body including hieratic scale and the composite view.

Rather than seeking to represent humans as they look in real life, bodies in ancient Egyptian art are often idealized and abstracted according to a certain canon of proportions.

The depiction of the pharaoh as an idealized, youthful, and athletic figure also reinforces the political message of the artwork, with the ruler appearing more eternal and divine than human.Still portrait sculptures of scribes are less formal than royal portraits, often seated figures with crossed legs and even sometimes with realistic rolls of fat on the figure's abdomen.

Here the scribe sits with a partly unrolled papyrus scroll on his knees. Khafre wears a kilt sitting rigidly upright on the throne made up of 2 lion's bodies, intertwined lotus and papyrus= unification of upper and lower egypt, Horus is on pharaohs head, royal false beard and wears linen head dress with uraeus cobra in front; serenity, figure of compactness and solidity body attatched to unarticulated slab that forms back .

Virtually all the wall-sculptures of the Ancient Egyptian Empire are in the form of bas-relief, while sunken and outline relief are the most common sculptural techniques used during the New Empire.

An unknown figure

Variations are obtained by changing the position of the arms. In the seated figures there is the same set pose of the head, body, and lower.

Khafre wears a kilt sitting rigidly upright on the throne made up of 2 lion's bodies, intertwined lotus and papyrus= unification of upper and lower egypt, Horus is on pharaohs head, royal false beard and wears linen head dress with uraeus cobra in front; serenity, figure of compactness and solidity body attatched to unarticulated slab that forms back of king's throne, arms are close to torso.

A comparison between the ancient egyptian sculptures of khafre and the seated scribe

Khafre Compared Contrast To Seated Scribe. pieces, “Khafre” and “Seated Scribe”, are two art pieces that have originated from the ancient Egyptian time period.

These two pieces are very similar and different in many ways. With this in mind, we learn that art work, depending on the time period, may have similar meanings but also different messages and that same time. Pyramid of Menkaure King Menkaure (Mycerinus) and queen The Seated Scribe Middle and New Kingdom including the magnificent seated statue of Khafre, now in the Egyptian Museum in Cairo.

On January 10, , excavators under the direction of George Reisner, head of the joint Harvard University-Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Expedition to Egypt.

Art of Ancient Egypt | Art History Teaching Resources